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    • PL/SQL Learning Library
      3.4 years ago  
      Oracle PL/SQL is a powerful, procedural database programming language, designed to enhance the set-oriented, declarative power of SQL. When you need to implement business rules and formulas, create a secure path to your data, or optimize data access, PL/SQL is the way to go. The PL/SQL Learning Library helps those new to PL/SQL get up to speed, and also provides resources for experienced PL/SQL programmers.
       
    • Bulk processing (FORALL and BULK COLLECT), along with the function result cache, are the "big ticket" items when it comes to performance optimization with PL/SQL. But there's still more we can do to tweak our code for even better response times for our users. This third webast in the series starts with the automatic compiler optimization, showcases the extraordinary speediness of PGA data manipulation (a.k.a., package variables), and demonstrates the effect of the simple NOCOPY hint. We finish up with an introduction to pipelined table functions and some thoughts on optimizing your algorithms.

       
    • That's right. VARCHAR2 declarations mean that you have to provide an "N" or constraint on the size of the variable. If you have such declarations all over your code, that's a form of hard-coding and you are likely to get hammered by VALUE_ERROR exceptions. This video shows how to fix this problem.

       
    • Since we write software using our brains, it is hard to avoid the impact of psychology and physiology of our brains on our code. This manifests quite clearly when it comes to hard-coding.

       
    • Watch as Steven explains what he means by hard-coding in PL/SQL.

       
    • Join Steven Feuerstein, well-known author and recognized Oracle PL/SQL expert, on a video tour that leads you to techniques which help you write practically perfect PL/SQL.

       
    • Join Oracle Architect Steven Feuerstein as he goes under the covers of applications to remind everyone that while the flashy stuff is fun, it's just part of what software professionals do. He explains how SQL and PL/SQL are an essential part of the software development process and will always be important.

       
    • Consistent, robust error management is a critical feature of any successful application. Developers need to know all that is possible in PL/SQL regarding the raising, handling and logging of errors, and that standardize the way in which those tasks are performed.
       
      Steven goes beyond the basics of exception handling in PL/SQL to explore the wide range of specialized error management features in Oracle. We will cover FORALL's SAVE EXCEPTIONS, DML error logging with the DBMS_ERRLOG package, the AFTERSERVERERROR trigger, the DBMS_UTILITY.FORMAT_ERROR_BACKTRACE function, and more. 
       
      In addition to covering error-related functionality, we'll also take a look at using assertion procedures to validate assumptions and execution tracing to better understand what is happening in your code.
       
    • Consistent, robust error management is a critical feature of any successful application. Developers need to know all that is possible in PL/SQL regarding the raising, handling and logging of errors, and that standardize the way in which those tasks are performed.
       
      Steven goes beyond the basics of exception handling in PL/SQL to explore the wide range of specialized error management features in Oracle. We will cover FORALL's SAVE EXCEPTIONS, DML error logging with the DBMS_ERRLOG package, the AFTERSERVERERROR trigger, the DBMS_UTILITY.FORMAT_ERROR_BACKTRACE function, and more. 
       
      In addition to covering error-related functionality, we'll also take a look at using assertion procedures to validate assumptions and execution tracing to better understand what is happening in your code.
       
    • The Function Result Cache, added in Oracle Database 11g, offers developers a way to dramatically reduce the amount of time it takes to retrieve data that is requested repeatedly by database sessions (specifically: when the same rows of a table are fetched much more frequently than they are changed). This cache is stored in the SGA, shared across all sessions in the instance, and automatically purged of "dirty data" by the Oracle Database. Every application running on Oracle Database 11g Release 1 or higher Enterprise Edition should be taking advantage of this feature. Best of all, there is minimal impact on your code to start using this feature!

       
    • The Function Result Cache, added in Oracle Database 11g, offers developers a way to dramatically reduce the amount of time it takes to retrieve data that is requested repeatedly by database sessions (specifically: when the same rows of a table are fetched much more frequently than they are changed). This cache is stored in the SGA, shared across all sessions in the instance, and automatically purged of "dirty data" by the Oracle Database. Every application running on Oracle Database 11g Release 1 or higher Enterprise Edition should be taking advantage of this feature. Best of all, there is minimal impact on your code to start using this feature!

       
    • Software managers are very good at putting pressure on developers to "get the job done" as quickly as possible, so as to meet usually unrealistic deadlines. The end result? Software with way too many bugs in it, and with it applications that require lots of resources simply to fix those bugs and maintain the code. If we are going to build and deploy successful applications, we have to think not only about getting that application in production today, but also the cost of keeping it in production (and meeting user needs) for years to come. This session offers a range of tips and techniques to improve the readability of your code and make it easier to maintain/evolve that code over time. This webinar offers a wide-ranging set of techniques to make your code easy to understand and maintain over time. These techniques include: the use of subtypes and local modules; how to activate and check compliance with standards; and encapsulation (information hiding). After watching this webinar, you will be able to write code that minimizes the amount of development resources needed to maintain that code.
       
    • Learn how to run a script to update your database, review database objects in your database, create and debug a PL/SQL procedure and create an run a unit test in SQL Developer.

       
    • Oracle PL/SQL makes writing SQL so darned easy – in fact, it is way too easy to write SQL. As a result, PL/SQL developers take SQL totally for granted, and very few organizations have any sort of guidelines in place for when, where and how to write SQL. The result? The same or similar SQL statements repeated throughout the application, making it very hard to optimize and maintain the code.
       
      This webinar starts by reviewing the role of SQL in PL/SQL applications, and the key challenges involved when writing SQL. We then step through the most important best practices for SQL construction, ranging from avoiding SQL repetition to full qualification of variable and column names.
       
      After viewing this webinar, you will be well positioned to establish and follow a set of guidelines for SQL construction that will have a significant impact on application performance and maintainability.
       
       
    • Recognizing patterns in a sequence of rows has been a capability that was widely desired, but not possible with SQL until now. There were many workarounds, but these were difficult to write, hard to understand, and inefficient to execute. With Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1), you can use the MATCH_RECOGNIZE clause to perform pattern matching in SQL to do the following:

      1. Logically partition and order the data that is used in the MATCH_RECOGNIZE clause with its PARTITION BY and ORDER BY clauses.
      2. Define patterns of rows to seek using the PATTERN clause of the MATCH_RECOGNIZE clause. These patterns use regular expressions syntax, a powerful and expressive feature, applied to the pattern variables you define.
      3. Specify the logical conditions required to map a row to a row pattern variable in the DEFINE clause.
      4. Define output measures, which are expressions usable in the MEASURES clause of the SQL query.
      5. Control the output (summary vs. detailed) from the pattern matching process
       
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