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Working with Java ME Embedded 8 by Using the Raspberry Pi Series


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  • Intelligent devices are becoming an ever more important and ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. Mobile phones represented the first wave of smaller personal computers. And now, as the price of electronics and processing power continues to fall, there is an intersection between sensors and other electromechanical devices and computers that live on the edge of the Internet: close to the source of the data, processing the data locally and sending just what is required to other computers to consume. This wave of machine-to-machine (M2M) technology, or more broadly, the Internet of Things (IoT), is rapidly shaping the future of computing. Oracle Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME) provides Java developers with a direct path to this new market space by using their existing knowledge and skills.

     

    The Raspberry Pi is a computer that is about the size of a deck of cards, yet it is capable of running a Linux distribution on its ARM 11 processor. The Raspberry Pi also supports USB, Ethernet, audio, HDMI, and RCA video output. But most importantly, the Raspberry Pi provides a 26-pin header that connects the computer to the outside world, through general-purpose input/output (GPIO) pins that can drive LEDs, read switches and other electronic signals, and connect to a wealth of inter-integrated circuit (I2C) devices, universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) devices, and more. This header and the Raspberry Pi's low cost is what makes the Raspberry Pi an ideal platform to develop real-world embedded applications with Java ME Embedded.

     

    In this series of tutorials, learn how to write Java Embedded applications and how to create circuits and connect them to the Raspberry Pi to sense a change in a switch, light an LED, read the current temperature and barometric pressure, determine your location using a GPS device, and more!

     

    For more information about Java Embedded, see the Java Embedded Documentation page.

    • This content is intended for the following job role(s): Java Embedded Developer
  • 22-Oct-13
  • Tom McGinn

Content List (click links below to view content)

28-FEB-2014 60 mins

Configuring the Raspberry Pi as an Oracle Java ME Embedded Development Platform

Intelligent devices are becoming an ever more important and ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. Mobile phones represented the first wave of smaller personal computers. And now, as the price of electronics and processing power continues to fall, there is an intersection between sensors and other electromechanical devices and computers that live on the edge of the Internet: close to the source of the data, processing the data locally and sending just what is required to other computers to consume. This wave of machine-to-machine (M2M) technology, or more broadly, the Internet of Things (IoT), is rapidly shaping the future of computing. Oracle Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME) provides Java developers with a direct path to this new market space by using their existing knowledge and skills.

 

In this tutorial, you prepare a Raspberry Pi to run Java ME Embedded 8, the most current version of Java ME Embedded. The Raspberry Pi is a computer that is about the size of a deck of cards, yet it is capable of running a Linux distribution on its ARM 11 processor. The Raspberry Pi also supports USB, Ethernet, audio, HDMI, and RCA video output. But most importantly, the Raspberry Pi provides a 26-pin header that connects the computer to the outside world, through general-purpose input/output (GPIO) pins that can drive LEDs, read switches and other electronic signals, and connect to a wealth of inter-integrated circuit (I2C) devices, universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) devices, and more. This header and the Raspberry Pi's low cost is what makes the Raspberry Pi an ideal platform to develop real-world embedded applications with Java ME Embedded.

22-OCT-2013 60 mins

Working with GPIO by Using Java ME Embedded and a Raspberry Pi

Intelligent devices are becoming an ever more important and ubiquitous part of our every day lives. Mobile phones represented the first wave of smaller personal computers. And now, as the price of electronics and processing power continues to fall, there is an intersection between sensors and other electromechanical devices and computers that live on the edge of the Internet: close to the source of the data, processing the data locally and sending just what is required to other computers to consume. This wave of machine-to-machine (M2M) technology, or more broadly, the Internet of Things (IoT), is rapidly shaping the future of computing. Oracle Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME) provides Java developers with a direct path to this new market space by using their existing knowledge and skills.

 

In this tutorial, you create a Java ME Embedded 8 EA application by using a desktop development environment. Using a breadboard, you wire a simple circuit to connect a push button switch to a GPIO pin (input) and you wire a light-emitting diode (LED) to an output pin. The application changes the state of the LED (on or off) every time you press the button. This circuit illustrates the use of a pull-down resistor and a modification to the trigger type on the input pin.

 

25-NOV-2013 60 mins

Working with Inter-integrated Circuits by Using Java ME Embedded and a Raspberry Pi

Intelligent devices are becoming an ever more important and ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. Mobile phones represented the first wave of smaller personal computers. And now, as the price of electronics and processing power continues to fall, there is an intersection between sensors and other electromechanical devices and computers that live on the edge of the Internet: close to the source of the data, processing the data locally and sending just what is required to other computers to consume. This wave of machine-to-machine (M2M) technology, or more broadly, the Internet of Things (IoT), is rapidly shaping the future of computing. Oracle Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME) provides Java developers with a direct path to this new market space by using their existing knowledge and skills.

 

In this tutorial, you create a Java ME Embedded 8 EA application that communicates with an I2C device designed to sense temperature and barometric pressure. You use a Bosch BMP085 digital pressure sensor device, which was designed for a broad set of use cases, including embedded devices that require low-voltage and ultra-low-power consumption.

12-DEC-2013 60 mins

Working with UART by Using Java ME Embedded and a Raspberry Pi

Intelligent devices are becoming an ever more important and ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. Mobile phones represented the first wave of smaller personal computers. And now, as the price of electronics and processing power continues to fall, there is an intersection between sensors and other electromechanical devices and computers that live on the edge of the Internet: close to the source of the data, processing the data locally and sending just what is required to other computers to consume. This wave of machine-to-machine (M2M) technology, or more broadly, the Internet of Things (IoT), is rapidly shaping the future of computing. Oracle Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME) provides Java developers with a direct path to this new market space by using their existing knowledge and skills.

 

In this tutorial, you create a Java ME Embedded 8 Early Access (EA) application that communicates with a GPS device. The device provides accurate positioning by using global positioning satellites. You use a MediaTek MT3339 chipset, which was designed for small, hand-held and mobile GPS applications. The chip is soldered on a breakout board that includes supporting components to make it compatible with the Raspberry Pi.

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